“The WOTUS rule and Clean Power Plan are prime examples of Washington bureaucrats run amok under the Obama administration, and these job-killing regulations need to go.” – Senator Roy Blunt

WASHINGTON, District of Columbia – This week, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (Mo.) discussed the future of agriculture at Missouri State University’s 2017 Agriculture Forum. Other panelists included Missouri Department of Agriculture Director Chris Chinn and Missouri Farm Bureau President Blake Hurst.

“With world food demand expected to double in the next 30 to 40 years, it’s critical that we have the right policies in place for Missouri farmers to be able to take advantage of the economic opportunities ahead,” said Blunt. “This forum was a great opportunity to talk about the actions this administration and congressional Republicans are taking to rein in out-of-control regulations and give agriculture industry leaders the tools they need to be successful in a 21st century economy.”

During the forum, Blunt applauded a recent Executive Order instructing the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to review and reconsider the Waters of the United States Rule. In addition to giving the EPA and Corps jurisdiction over 99.7 percent of Missouri, the rule would have increased permitting costs by as much as $52 million and environmental mitigation costs by as much as $113 million annually, according to the Small Business Administration.

Blunt also highlighted an Executive Order issued last month that begins dismantling the so-called Clean Power Plan. The CPP would add up to $39 billion in annual compliance costs, which would inevitably be passed on to businesses and consumers, amounting to a national energy tax on anyone who harvests a crop, flips a light switch, or visits a doctor’s office.

Blunt continued, “The WOTUS rule and Clean Power Plan are prime examples of Washington bureaucrats run amok under the Obama administration, and these job-killing regulations need to go. I’m grateful that this administration is taking swift action to protect Missourians from burdensome regulations that drive up costs and make it impossible for them to do their jobs.”

Blunt, a member of the U.S. Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation and the Internet, also discussed his efforts to ensure rural Missourians have the benefits of broadband, which is necessary for education, telemedicine, economic development, and precision agriculture.

“Ag Forum is an essential part of fostering a sense of community among our students, staff, faculty and agricultural leaders. We are excited about the future of agriculture, and appreciate the support from government and industry officials,” said Dr. Ronald Del Vecchio, Dean of the Darr College of Agriculture.