Connect with us

Lifestyle

Dave Portnoy sits down with Jesse Watters to talk about The Washington Post writing a hit piece on Portnoy and his pizza festival and then later cancelling interviews, as well as the state of journalism in the US.

Dave Portnoy sits down with Jesse Watters to talk about The Washington Post writing a hit piece on Portnoy and his pizza festival and then later cancelling interviews, as well as the state of journalism in the US.

Published

on

Dave Portnoy, the founder of Barstool Sports,

Dave Portnoy, the founder of Barstool Sports, was no stranger to controversy. His unapologetic style and sharp wit had earned him both loyal fans and fierce critics. But now, sitting down for an interview with a prominent news anchor, Dave was ready to tackle some of the toughest questions about his reputation.

The interview began with a lighthearted exchange about Dave’s choice of eyewear that day, which drew a chuckle from both the host and the audience. It was clear that despite his reputation, Dave could handle a little self-deprecating humor.

Then, the conversation took a more serious turn as the host asked Dave why he believed The Washington Post had such a strong dislike for him. Dave pondered for a moment before offering his perspective.

Advertisement

“In this era, ever since Trump came on the scene, I feel like people’s brains just got broken,” Dave said with a wry smile. He continued, “The Washington Post is widely left-leaning, like the New York Times and Business Insider. Unfortunately, I can predict whether I’m going to be talked about positively or negatively just by the name of the organization. If it’s Fox, it’s probably going to be good. If it’s The Washington Post, it’s going to be bad. That’s a sad state for both sides, to be honest.”

The host pressed further, asking if Dave believed the negative attention was due to his association with Trump. Dave nodded, acknowledging that his connection to the former president had indeed painted a target on his back.

“I think they view me as a symbol of that entitled, bro culture,” Dave explained. “And that’s something that’s despised by The Washington Post and the New York Times. We’ve become a symbol of that culture, and they want to take us down.”

Advertisement

The host then delved into the disturbing trend of media outlets not just disagreeing with figures like Dave but actively trying to destroy their entire enterprises. Dave pondered this shift and pointed out that journalism had become more like activism.

“They’re not looking for the truth,” Dave asserted. “There’s not an ounce of journalism left. They have no interest in the truth, none.”

The conversation then turned to a specific incident where a journalist had written a hit piece about Dave. He revealed that, despite his numerous attempts to engage with the journalist and set the record straight, his efforts had been in vain.

Advertisement

“Emily Steele was the author’s name,” Dave recalled. “I reached out to her probably 10 to 15 times, begging for a sit-down. I said I will tell you anything you want to know. I am an open book, maybe too much of an open book.”

The host chimed in, suggesting that perhaps journalists were afraid that if they got to know Dave personally, th

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Lifestyle

UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees has voted to reallocate $2.3 million from Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) programs to police and public safety measures.

UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees has voted to reallocate $2.3 million from Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) programs to police and public safety measures.

Published

on

The UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees has voted to reallocate $2.3 million from Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) programs to police and public safety measures. The decision was influenced by recent pro-Palestinian protests on campus, with some trustees expressing concerns about divisiveness and indoctrination associated with DEI initiatives. The funds, previously used for personnel expenditures, will now be directed towards enhancing campus security. This move has sparked a range of reactions, with some supporting the decision as a necessary step for campus safety, while others criticize it as a setback for diversity and inclusion efforts.

Continue Reading

Hot News

The Haunting Echoes of the Past: How Adolf Hitler’s Mindset Persists in Today’s World Issues

The Haunting Echoes of the Past: How Adolf Hitler’s Mindset Persists in Today’s World Issues

Published

on

In the annals of history, few names evoke as much fear and horror as Adolf Hitler. His rise to power in the 1930s and the subsequent atrocities committed under his leadership, culminating in the Holocaust, have left an indelible mark on the world. Yet, despite the passage of time and the lessons learned from the Second World War, the echoes of Hitler’s mindset can still be heard reverberating in the issues that plague our world today.

The seeds of Hitler’s ideology were sown in the aftermath of World War I. The Treaty of Versailles, which imposed harsh conditions on Germany, fueled a sense of humiliation and resentment among the German population. Hitler capitalized on this sentiment, promising to restore Germany to its former glory. He blamed the country’s problems on the Jews, who he claimed were part of a global conspiracy to undermine the Aryan race. This scapegoating allowed Hitler to rally support for his cause and set the stage for the horrors that were to follow.

Fast forward to the present day, and we can see echoes of Hitler’s mindset in the rise of far-right movements and the resurgence of antisemitism. In recent years, there has been a disturbing increase in hate crimes against Jews, as well as other minority groups. The Anti-Defamation League reported a 34% increase in antisemitic incidents in the United States in 2019, the highest level in decades. This trend is not limited to the US; similar increases have been observed in Europe and other parts of the world.

Advertisement

One of the reasons for this resurgence is the spread of misinformation and conspiracy theories online. Just as Hitler used propaganda to spread his message, today’s far-right groups use social media and other online platforms to spread their ideologies. These groups often promote the idea of a “globalist” conspiracy, echoing Hitler’s claims about a Jewish conspiracy.

Another way in which Hitler’s mindset persists is in the use of scapegoating to distract from real issues. Just as Hitler blamed Germany’s problems on the Jews, today’s leaders and movements often blame immigrants, minorities, and other vulnerable groups for economic and social issues. This strategy is not only morally reprehensible, but it also prevents real solutions from being found.

The legacy of Hitler’s mindset is also evident in the rise of authoritarianism and the erosion of democratic norms. Hitler’s rise to power was facilitated by the breakdown of democratic institutions in Germany. Today, we see similar trends in countries around the world, with leaders undermining the rule of law, attacking the press, and eroding checks and balances on their power.

Advertisement

In conclusion, the echoes of Adolf Hitler’s mindset can still be heard in the issues that plague our world today. From the resurgence of antisemitism to the rise of authoritarianism, the lessons of history have not been learned. It is up to all of us to stand up against hate and bigotry, to defend democratic values, and to ensure that the horrors of the past are never repeated.

Continue Reading

Hot News

Jewish Professor DENIED entry at Columbia University

Published

on

Jewish Professor DENIED entry at Columbia University, where he works as an assistant professor, after Palestinian activists blocked all Jews from entering. Staff at the university also deactivated his access card.

https://youtu.be/4ph9mIH1Nyg

https://youtu.be/4ph9mIH1Nyg
Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2024 Missourinetwork.tv | BigPlanetMedia